Dallas, TX: Top Things to Know About Storage

Krista Diamond |

The Essentials

Lately, it seems like everyone is moving to Texas, and we’re not just talking about Austin. The population in Dallas is growing and we can see why. The city has warm weather, a thriving downtown and best of all, barbecue for days. As the city grows, the demand for housing and storage has increased and likely will continue to increase. The cost of living in Dallas is 8.3% above the national average and a large part of that figure is accounted for by rent prices. Rent downtown and you’ll pay about $1800 a month for a one bedroom. Rent elsewhere and you’ll pay $900 on average (we don’t know about you, but we’ll take the $900 a month place and use Uber to get downtown). Just like the cost of living, storage unit prices are slightly above the national average in Dallas, though there’s such a large number of facilities in the city that it isn’t hard to find space at a price that works for you. On average, you can expect to pay around $46 a month for a 5x5 unit and $152 a month for a 10x10 unit. Fortunately, the pains of rising rent are eased by an unemployment rate that’s 3.5% and shrinking and a median household income that’s higher than the Texas state average. The city is also home to the second highest number of billionaire residents in a metro area, so if you play your cards right, you can count yourself among them (or at least befriend one).

Why You Should Consider Dallas Traffic When Choosing a Storage Unit

First off, yes, it really is as bad as you’ve heard. Dallas traffic is the stuff of nightmares. If it’s any comfort, the infamous I-635 isn’t quite as bad as Austin’s I-35, but it’s pretty close. In fact, Dallas traffic costs $128.45 million annually in congestion costs and supposedly forces the city to miss out on a billion dollars in revenue thanks to all of those people who can’t spend money because they’re stuck in traffic. Public transportation does exist in the form of DART. The city is actually one of the largest operators of light rail in the country, but you probably didn’t know that because Dallas has always been and probably always will be a car city. So why are we bringing this up in an article about storage? Well, if you’re renting a unit with set hours—let’s say 9-5—and you get off work at 4 and find that traffic is suddenly not just bad but horrible, do you think you’ll make it to your storage unit that normally just 25 minutes away before closing? Instead of forcing yourself to rush only to get there just as the gates are closing, rent at a facility with 24 hour access. Pro Tip: You can filter your results on StorageFront so that you’re only seeing facilities that offer this.

Alcohol Storage in the Land of Frozen Margaritas

In 1971, a man in Dallas named Mariano Martinez was trying to make his father’s margarita recipe even better. After countless chunky atrocities courtesy of a not-so-great blender, he was about to give up. Then, on a routine coffee trip to 7-11, his eyes fell upon the chain’s famous Slurpee machine and it suddenly all made sense. By tinkering around with an old soft-serve ice cream machine, he was able to make the world’s first frozen margarita machine. And the rest is history. If you’re a fan of tequila (and we’re sure there’s a good chance that you are since Americans drink an average of 185,000 margaritas an hour according to a study by Brown-Forman), it’s important to know how to store it properly, if that’s something you’re interested in doing. If you’re storing wine, you can look for facilities that cater to wine storage or at least offer climate control, but if you’re storing hard liquor, taking the time to prevent breakage and spills is the most important precaution. And if you’re looking to try the original frozen margarita, Mariano Martinez’s original can still be found at Mariano's Hacienda. You’re welcome.

A Light Dusting of Snow Makes Everyone Panic

If thinking about Dallas traffic makes you want to stay home, consider doing it in the winter when the city’s residents all collectively freak out over the tiniest sprinkling of snowflakes. Dallas has hot, humid summers that soar into the 100’s and winters that are mild for the most part. However, most winters do experience a very, very small amount of snow. In these instances, it’s worthwhile to see if you have a snow day from work and also to make sure that any businesses that you’re planning on patronizing are still open. That goes for your storage facility too. And if you’re worried about the heavy thunderstorms and occasional tornadoes that Dallas gets hit by in the spring, prioritize indoor units in your search for storage, sign up for storage insurance (it’s cheaper than you think!) and make sure it covers natural disasters like flash floods.