How to Store a Chandelier

Jon Fesmire |

So, you have a classy chandelier in your dining room and you need to put it into storage. The thing is, it’s large, heavy and fragile to boot. How do you pack it and store it without breaking it?

We’ll be honest. It is a bit tricky, and you’ll want a friend or two to help, but it can certainly be done. Here’s how.

Packing Your Chandelier

There are a few things you’ll need before you start. These are:

  • A strong, sturdy ladder

  • A corrugated box large enough to hold the chandelier in the shape it has while hanging

  • A box for the light bulbs

  • A box for the various parts attached to the main chandelier

  • Packing paper or bubble wrap

  • Packing peanuts

  • Foam sheets

  • Screwdrivers - flat head and Phillip’s head

  • A rope about 20 feet long

Move aside anything that is beneath the chandelier and unplug the light fixture itself. Next, use a sturdy ladder and climb up to where you can work on the chandelier. Remove the lightbulbs and hand them down to your helpers. They can then wrap the bulbs in packing paper or bubble wrap, and place them in the designated box.

Next, remove the various attached parts and hand them down. Your helpers can wrap those in packing paper or bubble wrap as well, and place them in the right box. Some of these parts may be hooked onto the chandelier, and some may be held on with screws, so use the correct screwdriver to remove them. Remove the electrical cords, if they detach, and set them aside.

Prepare the corrugated box for the chandelier by taping the bottom strongly, and adding a sheet of foam about a half inch thick to the bottom. Place the box underneath the chandelier. Next, tie one end of the rope to the top, hook portion of the chandelier itself, then remove the chandelier, slowly and carefully from the ceiling hook, and put the next portion of rope into the ceiling hook. Make sure the knot is strong. Have one or both of your helpers hold the rope from the ground so you can let go of the chandelier. If you did this correctly, they can now slowly lower the chandelier by feeding the rope through the ceiling hook.

Once the chandelier is in the box, its bottom parts just touching the foam, fill in all the spaces with the packing peanuts. This is why you’ll need a box that’s as tall as the chandelier is when hanging. Make sure the peanuts are in tight so the chandelier has little room to move. When this is done, your helpers can let go of the rope, and you can remove the knot.

Put the second piece of foam over the chandelier, then close and seal the box with packing tape. Bundle the cords, wrap them with twist-ties, and put them in the accessories box. Seal the lightbulb and accessories boxes, and label all three with “Fragile.”

It’s Okay to Hire a Pro

Once again, this is delicate work. Many items have specific packing steps, but once you know them, the actual job is easy. That’s not the case with a chandelier. So, if you’re afraid you’ll accidentally damage your chandelier, we recommend you hire a professional to do it. Check with local moving and packing companies and ask how much they’ll charge for this procedure.

Moving the Chandelier to Storage

Since chandeliers can be so fragile, it’s important to get yours to storage carefully.

At home, have a friend help you carry it to your vehicle. Ensure there’s enough room for it in the back cab, trunk, or back seat, and slide it in gently.

Drive it to your storage facility with your helper, and park close to your unit. There, find one of the moving carts meant for multiple boxes, and together, place the chandelier box on the cart, with the other two boxes on top of or beside it.

In your unit, do not stack heavy boxes on top of the chandelier box. If you have a stack of wide, sturdy boxes, you may be able to place the chandelier box on top of it, but make sure it’s fully on the stack and not tipping to one side or the other. If you have a deep, wide shelf, you can place it there, along with the extra boxes.

While glass items typically do not require climate control, electrical parts can suffer damage in extreme cold or heat. So, it’s a good idea to keep your chandelier and its extra parts in a climate controlled unit.

With these steps taken, your chandelier should remain in good shape while in storage, ready for when you’re ready to use it again.